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Pencil Art

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Pencil artwork or pencil sketch painting has a childhood innocence and an adult’s careful skill both amalgamated inside it. It is laborious, distinct and holds a chasm of impact. With paper as a platform, pencil artists can turn empty landscapes into eye-catching portraits or visions of city-scapes. Graphite was used for painting in central Europe during the sixteenth century, but its use increased dramatically by the end of the eighteenth century. By the end of the eighteenth century, pencils started being made of low quality clay and graphite, based on the invention of Nicolas-Jacques conté. Made of particles that slide easily over one another, graphite easily produces marks on paper or vellum that often appear glossy when viewed in oblique-angled or torn light. Adjusting the dimensions of graphite and clay produces variations in both texture and depth of tone. A higher percentage graphite produces stronger, more silver tones, while a larger amount of clay produces soft and dark pencils. The detailing and dryness of graphite pencils allows it to be a great medium for sketches of various measures.

Indian artist Shashikant Dhotre’s profound color-pencil work also stands as an illuminating example of the pencil sketch painting medium, especially the pieces made on black paper. Varying line thickness, pressure regulated in softer and deeper strokes, the sharpness of the pencil- all seem to play a role in skill of this medium. Numerous artists prefer the dry, erasable texture of pencils on paper as the ultimate mode of their portraits yet significant others seem to swear by pencil underdrawings and over drawings in their mixed-media works. The ruggedness and construction of a pencil artwork lies in the pointedness of its lines and silhouettes. Even the tooth of the paper, on which the graphite makes it marks, enhances and moulds the nature of the sketches. The softer, gentler technique of shading and blending in pencil artworks is also curiously unique to each artist. Some may choose to blend discreetly, with lines and edges uncertain and merging while others use a bolder, more clashing style of shading and gradients. These shadowy patches and reflections give pencil art its own trademark look which is often hard to replicate; the curious and deft pencil artist stands out from the crowd and their skill is unmatched in its ingenuity. Knowing when and how to use the eraser is also a particular skill with this medium and often it is the erasure in a pencil portrait that will bring to limelight it's many delicate intricacies and potent impressionistic tendencies. Good quality smooth paper allows for finer detailing but paper usually suffers in the long run. This is why a number of old pencil works or cartoons have a nostalgically eroded look and have to be preserved using careful fixtures. Nowadays with convergence of media, we can also find traditional arts like Madhubani painting pencil sketch as well as dedicated to a particular figure like Buddha painting pencil sketch.