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Natural Colour Painting on Paper

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7 Item(s)

per page

Natural color often refers to organic dyes that have been curated using natural ingredients and are then used for pigmentation and used for natural colour painting. There is a certain earthiness and humility that gives texture to natural colours. It has been used since prehistoric times, with the first written text of their plan dating back to 5000 bc. Cultures from all over the world have used living organisms from plants, animals, and minerals to create a colour that they can use in painting spaces to create representative forms. Natural colours continued to be the basis for oil paint until the 19th century with the introduction of synthetic and petroleum-based pigments. Each civilization has had its own unique way of creating and using natural dyes, and we have seen these processes pass down from generation to generation, to the renaissance, to modern practices. Many artists today use natural materials as they are in harmony with nature and are surprisingly easy to use.

Natural dyes are also used in making prints, spinning paper and sewing threads, used in the production of crayons and even in silk painting in Asian art. The possibilities of exploration with natural dyes in art are endless-novice artists can follow how some of the most famous artists apply them to their bodies of work, and there is always something satisfying about creating and using natural pigments to create one’s own designs. Using natural colour on paper, asks the question of why the rise for earthy, eco-friendly materials arose; many critics say that concerns about the toxicity of art objects have rekindled interest in the natural elements of fine art painting. Oil painting has long been associated with health risks due to almost entirely the use of solvent in painting and cleaning. Although solvents are not required for oil painting, many artists use solvents to change the way oil paints treat and are designed to evaporate completely as the paint dries. Lavender or spike oil has received a lot of attention lately and is recommended to artists as a healthy alternative to traditional solvents, such as turpentine and mineral spirits.

Before art stores, paint was not as readily available in tubes and tins as it is today. Approximately 50,000 years ago, ancient painters developed original colors, using a mixture of soil, animal fats, minerals, coal and chalk. With these natural materials, they painted the walls of the cave in limited colors of red, yellow, brown, black, and white. Since then, scientific and technological advances have led to many colors and designs of paint. However, natural pigment is that which is found and then filtered, purified, and in rare cases, heated, to create the desired color and make a natural colour painting. Since its inception, native pigments have served many artistic purposes in ancient cultures around the world. The first natural colour paintings, from prehistoric times, were paintings in caves used for brushing, anointing, peeling, and even spraying techniques. Artists used whatever pigment was available to them from natural sources. This included earth colors such as red and yellow ochre, charcoal, and white from ground calcite. In India, traditional mural or floor paintings are still carried out using naturally made dyes. Today natural colors are used on paper by a number of popular and indigenous artists, and their hefty texture as well as non-polluting advantages clearly make them the top choice for experimentation.